Giacomo Brunelli – Venice

In his latest body of work, Giacomo Brunelli turns his distinctive lens on the most photogenic of cities, Venice. In January 2020, Brunelli took to the bridges and canals of Venice, two months after the city experienced devastating flooding – a result of the worst acqua alta, or high water, in over 50 years. Having always been fascinated by the city’s vulnerability, he embarked on a project that explores the archipelago’s uniquely intricate landscape: over 100 islands, connected by countless bridges and waterways.

Venice features Brunelli’s distinctive film-noir style to create a unique and evocative view of the city and its famous landmarks. He softens the landscape, as well as its anonymous figures, into black-and-white chiaroscuro, the glimpses of gondolieres and abstract reflections an emblematic depiction of an enduring city. Working entirely in analogue format, Brunelli shoots his photographs with a 1960s Miranda Sensomat 35mm camera, given to him by his father, and meticulously handprints his photographs in limited edition prints.

Giacomo Brunelli’s previous major projects, The Animals, Eternal London and New York have all received widespread critical acclaim and been published as books by Dewi Lewis Publishing. His work has been exhibited internationally and been the recipient of awards including Sony World Photography and Magenta Foundation’s Flash Forward. Venice is also available as a book, a standard format and a special edition with two limited edition print options. 

Prints are available as Silver Gelatin 9 x 12″, Edition of 10 – prices starting at £850 and 20 x 24″, Edition of 5 – prices starting at £1,500.

To see more of the series, or to order a book, please visit https://www.giacomobrunelli.com/books  

Cream 2022

The gallery is pleased to present Cream 2022, a special selection of some of the gallery’s favourite emerging photographic graduate artists who have featured in one of our annual Cream exhibition showcases dating back to 2008.

Shiho Kito

Shiho Kito was selected for one of the first ever Cream shows in 2009. After completing her MA at the LCC, Kito has worked between the UK, Japan and India. Her major project ‘pikari’ (dazzlingly) has exhibited extensively across Europe and Asia and received an Honourable Mention at the Magenta Flash Forward Awards. She has received several grants from the Nomura Foundation, Japan, which included the major exhibition, ‘Another Way of Telling, New Stories from India and Japan’ alongside Karen Knorr at Kytographie, Kyoto. Her current body of work, Kagami (mirror) is an attempt to contemplate the idea of ​​photography within the landscape.

Katinka Goldberg

Katinka Goldberg was also selected for Cream 2019. Goldberg’s work has been exhibited extensively in Europe since her graduation from the Edinburgh College of Art. Her photobook ‘Surfacing’ was included in Martin Parr/Gerry Badger’s anthology A History of Photobooks Volume III, and her latest solo museum show at Norway’s Kongsberg Art Centre features work from series ‘Bristningar’ (Rupture) which uses the amputated and then reconstructed body as a way to visualise fragmented identity.

Chloe Rosser

Since exhibiting at Cream 2013, Chloe Rosser has since received the ArtSlant Prize and won the Tokyo International Foto Awards in 2019. Her graduate work ‘Form’ and her recent project ‘Function’ have been exhibited around the world. The work is an exploration of our experience of being human and our fraught relationship with our bodies.

Nigel Maynard

2016 graduate Nigel Maynard went on to complete an MA at Westminster University. His on-going project ‘Formshire’ has exhibited widely around the UK and featured in several publications. The series looks at how the making of abstract photographs is comparable with the exploration of an unknown landscape.

Angela Blažanović

Angela Blažanović was part of Cream in 2019.  She is currently studying for an MA in Photography at the Royal College of Art. Her graduate project ‘Fragments of a River’, creating compositions from found objects on the bed of the River Thames at low tide, won several awards including AOP Student Award and was shortlisted for 2020 Photo London Emerging Photographer of the Year Award 2020. Through an approach somewhere between photography and sculpture, the artist investigates the symbiotic relationship between human and landscape, often using overlooked and discarded traces of our human presence.

Kira Krasz

Kira Krasz is one of the youngest photographers in our selection. She was a part of Cream in 2019 with her highly-acclaimed degree project ‘Thought after Taught’. The project received the Photoworks Student Award and her follow-up project ‘A Living Sense of Home’ won the Coup de Coeur Leica Award at the Hangar Art Prize. She has recently received a three-year scholarship from The Hungarian Academy of Arts for her current project ‘From Marble to Stone’.

Ocean Farini

Featured in Cream’s 2017 edition, Ocean’s series ‘Front Door’ is the result of a year long socially-engaged residency on Flakefleet estate. In it, Farini placed herself within the pages of ‘Slimming’ magazines from the 70’s and 80’s. The series celebrates, questions and what it is to grow-up and grow-into a place through photographs, clothes and words

In 2018, Ocean was awarded the LeftCoast Long-Term Residency, where she created ‘Front Door’ .

Nicholas Constant

In his series ‘Predator/Protector’, Constant Explores the evolution of the battle field. Taking a look at the landscape of the British UAV program and its complacency with even more destructive programs around the world, Predator/ Protector aims to contrast the idealistic and unintrusive views with the reality of what is taking place in these locations to show that they are part of the ever-expanding ‘battlespace’ in the information age. These images are combined with representations of aspects that are impossible to capture due to restricted access (the UAVs themselves and the operating rooms.) The juxtaposition reveals interesting parallels that would not have been achieved by photographing the investigated subjects alone.

Shortly after Cream 2015, he won the Magnum Graduate Photographer of the Year Award in 2016 with his project ‘Firn’, and was shortlisted for the Metro Imaging award in 2018.

Karine Laval – Barragan

French photographer Karine Laval’s new series of work were taken in Cuadra San Cristobal, a private estate outside of Mexico City, designed and developed by legendary architect Luis Barragan in the 1960s. Laval produced this series in 2019 during a visit to Mexico City, a city that fascinates her due to its many examples of modernist architecture coexisting with luxuriant nature within one of the largest urban centres in the world.

The series continues many of Laval’s ongoing artistic interests in the notions of space, architecture, colour and how it affects our sense of perception and emotions, and the relationship we entertain with the environment, particularly with the element of water. She also harbours a particular interest in avant-garde and mid-century modern architecture and design with Barragan being one of her favourite architects.

Geometric lines and unusual angles combined with their reflections in water and the intense colour palette and shimmering heat create a dazzling, sun-bleached abstract landscape where memory and reality collide. The new series, Barragan, is being launched at Photo London at Somerset House, 12th-15th May.

Rachel Louise Brown – Salty Clowns

The practice and potential of Photo Therapy is something that has long interested Rachel Louise Brown, so during the pandemic lockdowns, she decided to explore for herself, photography’s power to heal. Building a small studio set in her living room, she used the performative nature of self-portraiture as a tool to cope with her grief, frustration and fear, instinctively gravitating towards clowns as a subject.

Alongside conjuring clown characters, having hired archival and historical outfits from the National Theatre & Clown Museum and attempted the art of clown make up, Brown was keen to learn new analogue techniques – particularly some of the earliest ones that have led to the world of photography as we know it today. Using an ex-police dept Graflex 5×4 camera found online & a pneumatic air shutter release cable, she shot the clowns onto paper negatives & developed them in her bathroom.

Since lockdowns have lifted, Brown has attempted to master the historical alchemical process of salt printing. Invented by William Henry Fox Talbot in the mid-1830s, salt printing was the earliest photographic method capable of fixing a negative to positive image on paper. Using salt water, silver nitrate and UV light as the main ingredients, Brown has created unique salt prints of her Salty Clowns. Because of the alchemical reactions that occur at every stage of this lengthy, laborious yet meditative process, no two images are the same. Each clown is toned with selenium to ensure permanence and waxed with beeswax and lavender for protection.

Tim Flach – Birds

Working for years in his studio and in the field, internationally acclaimed photographer Tim Flach has portrayed nature’s most alluring creatures alertly at rest and dramatically in flight, capturing intricate feather patterns and subtle coloration invisible to the naked eye.

From familiar friends including the king penguin and the black swan, to marvelous rarities such as the kagu and the Bali myna, Flach conveys the dazzling diversity of birds. Here are all manner of songbirds, parrots, and birds of paradise; birds of prey, waterbirds, and theatrical domestic breeds.

Witness the shy gaze of the southern cassowary and the fearless stare of the Andean condor; marvel at the peregrine falcon—the fastest animal on Earth—in flight, wings outstretched, and the iridescent plumage of the Himalayan monal.

The result of much patience, precision, and persistence, Birds features more than 180 extraordinary photographs. Putting us face-to-face with some of Earth’s most magnetic living beings, Flach evokes the magnificence of the animal kingdom—and the urgent need to protect and defend it.

Ben Thomas – Water

The gallery is pleased to present our first series of work from acclaimed Australian photographer, Ben Thomas. The Hasselblad Master has a dynamic approach to photography. When he moved to Melbourne in his mid-twenties, the camera was his key to discovering the vibrant city. Since then, he has photographed the Australian landscape in a uniquely hyperreal style, combining a documentary eye with a strong visual aesthetic that slowly reveals a hidden narrative playing out, and asks how people identify with their surroundings.

In his latest series, Water, Thomas explores Australia’s most impressive natural phenomenon: its ocean. Utilising distortion and perspective in his photographs, Thomas casts beachgoers and surfers as minuscule figurines in his vast landscapes, while his bleached-out vistas of saltwater swimming pools and sandy beaches adhere more closely to compositional traditions. Wherever you glance, Thomas is playing with your eye; you have to look twice if you want to experience the full impact of these visually rich and playful scenes. 

Adding Hasselblad Master to his list of awards, Ben has been recognized on multiple occasions previously: Winner, LensCulture Emerging Talents 2016 Jurors’ Pick; Finalist, William and Winifred Bowness Photography Prize 2016; Winner, 125 LIVE Olympus Vision Award (London) 2015 honoring an established artist for pushing the boundaries of the medium through innovation, technical expertise and originality; Winner in Photography Category, Desktop Create Awards 2015. 

Johanna Goodman – The Catalogue of Imaginary Beings

Based in New York, Johanna Goodman is an illustrator and collagist who studied at Boston University’s School of Fine Art and Parsons School of Design (NYC) where she graduated with a BA of Fine Arts in Illustration in 1992. She has been a freelance Illustrator ever since. Her work has garnered awards from The Society of Publication Design, American Illustration and Communication Arts. 

In 2017 she was awarded the New York State Council for the Arts/New York Foundation for the Arts Fellowship grant for her on-going body of work The Catalogue of Imaginary Beings. The images, developed from over twenty years of portraiture and collage work, explore a range of themes in popular culture, including the role of the individual in fashion, in history, in the artistic imagination and draws inspiration from magical realism, surrealism and symbolism.

Johanna’s work has been featured in a wide variety of publications from The Guardian and Marie Claire to Vice and Creative Review. Her work has also been included in several books about Illustration, Art and Collage including The American Illustration Annual Book, 3×3: The Best of International Illustration, Communication Arts Illustration Annual, and she was profiled in The Age of Collage: Contemporary Collage in Modern Art published by Gestalten.

 

 

Ellie Davies – Stillness

Ellie Davies is a fine art photographer, an LCC MA graduate in 2008, who has been working in the forests of the UK for the past ten years, producing work which explores the complex interrelationship between the landscape and the individual.

Taken in Autumn/Winter 2020, in her native New Forest, Ellie Davies’ new series ‘Stillness’ captures the woodland at a particularly magical and evocative time of day.

”…As the sun sets and the warmth of the day fades, a deep silence falls over the forest. At twilight a thick fog lies over the land, immersing the landscape in stillness…”  

‘Stillness’ will be previewed at Photo London, Somerset House from 9th-12th September.

All prints are available in two print sizes, 68cmx90cm and 90cmx120cm, both in limited editions of 7 plus 2 Artist Proofs. As with all earlier series, the editions will be priced with an incremental price structure, so prints increase in price as the edition sells out.

Samuel Hicks – Towers

Fellows Court 1, St. Mary’s Estate, Hackney, London, 2020 – Samuel Hicks

Photographer Samuel Hicks grew up in London, and his new mini-series ‘Towers’, celebrates some of the city’s Modernist social housing developments in South and East London. Looking for an easily accessible subject to get out and photograph after the 2nd Coronavirus lockdown was lifted in November, Samuel returned to a subject that he had documented as some of his first work as a professional photographer.

Featured in this series are the St. Mary’s Estate in Hackney, Falstaff House in Hoxton and the Dorset Estate in Bethnal Green designed by influential modernist architects Skinner, Bailey and Lubetkin. Built between the 1950s and 1970s, and loved and loathed in equal measure, these estates once covered large parts of South and East London, but many are now being knocked down and replaced. Photographed at dusk, the architecture, and in particular, the lighting of these buildings takes on a new aesthetic and becomes highly cinematic. 

Samuel Hicks has forged a successful career in commercial and editorial photography, travelling the world working for clients such as Nike, Land Rover and Coca Cola. His personal work has taken him on location to Sweden, Norway, the US and Ireland where he shot the New York State Circus with projects published in The Independent, Wallpaper and Huck Magazine. In the last few years, his personal projects have included a series of short films on youth culture.

Morgan Silk – Nightwalks

Nathan's - Coney Island NY

British photographer Morgan Silk has captured his nocturnal wanderings around the United States in a series of beautifully rich and dreamy black and white images. Taken during a road trip across the US in 2014, starting in NY and ending in New Orleans via Tennessee, Mississippi and Alabama, ‘Nightwalks’ captures cities and its people in reflective and introspective mood, a certain hush fallen in the small, quiet hours.

Silk states about the project, “Similarly to much of my other work, the images are purely observational and were unplanned without any particular concept or idea of any particular subject, shot on the hoof with a pocket camera and no other equipment. No setting up, no waiting for the light. More akin to street photography in approach. I warm to the concept of no concept when out with a camera, it’s where my love for photography began and I find the best images I make come out of nowhere, unexpectedly and without preconceived ideas. You have to allow yourself to be receptive and let things flow freely, just being there in a totally new place, equipped and present at the right moment. The images instinctively come to you if you are open to seeing them. Thinking can get in the way sometimes so simply going out with a camera in this way is more about photographing by feel and less about thinking.”

Morgan Silk is a highly successful and award-winning advertising and fine art photographer. His highly acclaimed project Zoo won an Association of Photographers Gold Award and an Honourable Mention at the International Photo Awards (2009). His portrait of Jake Tassell from the series ‘After The Riots’ was selected as one of the 6 limited edition covers of 2009’s Creative Review Photography Annual. His ‘Saturn V Rockets’ series won ‘Award of Excellence in Communication’ at the Arts Photography Annual Awards 2016.

Hugh Holland – Silver. Skate. Seventies.

On the occasion of the release of his latest monograph, ‘Silver. Skate. Seventies’published by Chronicle Chroma Books, skate photographer Hugh Holland unveils some never-before-seen images from his archives. Beginning in 1975, Holland masterfully captured the burgeoning culture of skateboarding against a sometimes harsh, but always sunny Southern California landscape.

These iconic images were first inspired on a late afternoon when Holland drove up Laurel Canyon Boulevard and encountered skateboarders carving up the drainage ditches along the side of the canyon. From suburban backyard haunts to the asphalt streets that connected them, Los Angeles was the birthplace of the legendary Dogtown and Z-Boys skateboarders. With their requisite bleached-blond hair, tanned bodies, tube socks and Vans, these young outsiders evoke the sometimes reckless, but always exhilarating origins of skateboarding culture.

In ‘Silver. Skate. Seventies’,Holland presents a raw, spontaneous understanding to his well-known colour photographs of the 1970’s skating scene. Holland shot these negatives while experimenting with new ideas, and often, for his own enjoyment. These early black and white images were in many ways the genesis for his later color works—providing us with a rare glimpse behind the creative curtain. To see more of Holland’s work, visit www.cranekalmanbrighton.com/ photographers/hughholland

Giles Revell – Royal Ballet

Giles Revell creates imagery that is driven by analytical and forensic ideas that question the boundaries of science and art. There is a distilled graphic style to his work which has a recurring curiosity for observing familiar themes with an alternative viewpoint. He is a master of lighting but also inspired by the potential of using new technologies to reveal innovative ways of expressing ideas.

This series of abstract dance images was made in collaboration with The Royal Ballet, exploring both the sculptural and emotional movement of classical dance in a bold contemporary way. Choreographed Royal Ballet dancers were captured with precision at very high speed to emphasise the energy, gesture and expression through time lapse. The work is on permanent show at the Royal Opera House and has been the cornerstone imagery to celebrate the relaunch of The Royal Opera House and The Linbury Theatre after large scale renovations and redesign of the building by the architects Stanton Williams.

Giles has won numerous photographic awards and high-profile commissions for his work as well as his very recent celebrated collaboration with The Royal Opera House. His work has been published and exhibited around the world and is represented in the permanent collection of the Victoria & Albert Museum and The Natural History Museum in the UK.

Johanna Goodman – The Catalogue of Imaginary Beings

Based in New York, American illustrator and collagist Johanna Goodman studied at Boston University’s School of Fine Art and Parsons School of Design (NYC) where she graduated with a BA of Fine Arts in Illustration in 1992. She has been a freelance Illustrator ever since. Her work has garnered awards from The Society of Publication Design, American Illustration and Communication Arts.

In 2017 she was awarded the New York State Council for the Arts/New York Foundation for the Arts Fellowship grant for her on-going body of work The Catalogue of Imaginary Beings. The images, developed from over twenty years of portraiture and collage work, explore a range of themes in popular culture, including the role of the individual in fashion, in history, in the artistic imagination and draws inspiration from magical realism, surrealism and symbolism.

Johanna’s work has been featured in a wide variety of publications from The Guardian and Marie Claire to Vice and Creative Review. Her work has also been included in several books about Illustration, Art and Collage including The American Illustration Annual Book, 3×3: The Best of International Illustration, Communication Arts Illustration Annual, and she was profiled in The Age of Collage: Contemporary Collage in Modern Art published by Gestalten. To view more of her work, click here

Christophe Jacrot

The gallery is very pleased to present the work new photographic artist Christophe Jacrot. Jacrot is a French photographer who found his subject by accident whilst on a shoot to take sun-lit photographs of Paris for a guidebook, but found himself caught in a torrential rainstorm. He decided to change focus, and the images he captured that day were exhibited and then published as Jacrot’s first monograph, Paris in the Rain.

This surprise deluge marked the start of Jacrot’s special relationship with bad weather, whose evocative and often romantic qualities escape us as we attempt to flee it. Since that pivotal moment, he has travelled the world searching out bad weather; he follows reports of monsoons in Tokyo, hurricanes in New York and snowstorms in France and Siberia, capturing the dramatic weather and emotions they create. The cinematic qualities of his work capture an unspoken narrative that flows through each image.

Since 2007, Jacrot has exhibited his work regularly in Paris and internationally. His series In the Mood for Rain was exhibited at the Kunstlicht Gallery in Shanghai in 2013, and in the same year his solo show entitled Black and White, containing works from New York in Black and Blizzard was exhibited at the Young Gallery in Brussels. His book, Météores, was published by Editions h’Artpon in 2015. This was followed in 2016 by Snjor, the images produced from his trips to Iceland, and then in 2017, New York in Black, Jacrot’s series of photographs taken during the blackout caused by Hurricane Sandy in 2012. To see more of Christoph’s work, and for sizes and prices, click here.

Karine Laval – Heterotopia

Karine Laval has continued her exploration of shape, colour and form with new works in her on-going series ‘Heterotopia’. In these new images, Laval’s evolving exploration of distorted realities and altered perceptions result in seductive manipulations of light and colour, created by combining analogue techniques and digital technologies.

Laval’s images often challenge the familiar perception we have of the world, and can be seen as a bridge between the world we live in and a more surreal and dreamlike dimension. Laval’s distinctive use and deliberate manipulation of colour, as well as the introduction of chance in some instances, contribute to further question the relationship between representation and reality, with some of these works moving towards abstraction and the dissolution of the image entirely.

Karine has just been nominated Laval for the 2019 Prix Pictet, the prestigious international award that combines photography with a concern for environmental sustainability. This year’s theme in Hope. This is the second time she has been nominated, the first being in 2016. Currently, she has a major solo show at SFO Museum in San Francisco, where she presents new and early work from Heterotopia. To see more of Karine’s work, click here.